On Learning

Let’s consider what learning is…

Learning is about connecting unknowns with knowns.

Connections must be made between things or concepts already understood with whatever the object concept is.

All things can be understood by their relationship to something else or by defining something by what it is or is not. It bears repeating that it may be useful to understand new concepts by what they are not. That is, to define limits or set boundaries for them.

Much like when a child learns that animals with four legs are called “dog” yet finds out he is wrong when he calls a cow a “dog.” He must learn the limits of the subsets of the class “quadruped.”

Whether you agree with the following quotes, you may gain something from contemplating them:

“Socrates believed that learning occurred when a teacher presented a concept, the student challenged it, and the teacher replied to the challenge. Together, the teacher and student created the learning. Ultimately, the teacher developed a deeper understanding of the concept or abandoned it if he couldn’t defend it.” (Borrowing Brilliance, p. 196)

In The Culture Code, Clotaire Rapaille credits Henri Laborit with “[drawing] a clear connection between learning and emotion, showing that without the latter the former was impossible.” (p. 6)